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Virtual Show and Tell Just what the title says it is.

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Old August 8th, 2018, 02:48 PM   #1
Kay Dee
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Default Of changing / aging colours

Just thought I'd post the following two examples of recently acquired rugs just to show how various colours fare with age in Chinese / Tibetan rugs. Both pieces from my modest collection, and due for a good wash, which is just around the corner, literally.

The first (top one below), an attractive IMO, village Ningxia piece, possibly a 'saddle top' - made for the Tibetan market - given the wear in certain parts. Circa 1900, or possibly before, with natural dyes. 52 x 82cms.

And lower, and again, IMO, a nice little Tibetan checker piece (mixture of natural and chemical dyes) but only when faded with age. I wouldn't even dream of buying the garish little beast it must have once been, as it looks like it must have looked (from looking at the non faded bottom of the rug) circa when it was made in about the 1920's. 58 x 65cms. (But those Tibetans sure liked / like bright colours to 'spice up' their arid environment, so who am I to say.)

Just goes to show what age can do though, and that you like what you like and you leave the rest.

And although it goes without saying, especially in the checker rug, pile side is at top in both sets of images. Enjoy, or not as the case may be.




Last edited by Kay Dee; August 8th, 2018 at 08:58 PM.
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Old August 10th, 2018, 03:22 PM   #2
Rich Larkin
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Hi Kay,

Nice pieces. I get your point on the dyes. I actually have a few items sporting colors that started life looking a bit different than what we can see now. I can accept it to a point, though the knowledge never goes away. I realize it is an affliction.

You being a guy who has seen a good deal of Chinese/Tibetan material, I thought I would post this mat I have owned for about 45 years or so. I acquired it in the USA.



It measures about 2' X 4'. It has a thick, meaty feel and a very flexible handle. All foundations are cotton. The foundation materials are relatively light and fine, whereas the pile yarn is on the more substantial side, a combination that usually renders a very pliable fabric. Of course, it uses the familiar monochromatic approach with selected colors, in this instance, the blues and reds.

I have always thought the reds were obviously synthetic, resembling certain penny candies we used to buy around the corner from school a l-o-n-g time ago, when a penny actually had financial standing. These two images give a good impression of them. I wouldn't say they have suffered tip-fade, but there is definitely a 'relaxation of intensity' on the pile side. I have never soaked them, and would be afraid to try it.





This item presently sits on top of a piece of furniture in the house that I visit frequently, but I must say I hadn't taken note of the extent the appearance of the light blue on the surface had moved away from its appearance on the back. In truth, there is a certain heathered look to the pile surface that the rug had when I bought it, which inspired a few non-ruggie acquaintances to covet the thing at the time on purely decorative grounds. What that particular color change means in technical terms, I can't say. I doubt the dye was a low-grade synthetic.

Anyway, getting back to the reds, I wonder whether you recognize them as familiar in material you have encountered in the market. For example, how do they relate to the reds in the little mat you posted?

I have handled many Chinese rugs over the years, and quite a few Tibetan as well, and this piece, though obviously in the same club, doesn't fall neatly and precisely into any of the usual categories with which I am familiar. Part of the special effect of this piece in comparison with others may be due to its very good condition. It shows virtually no wear. BTW, the pale camel colored wool is a candidate for possibly being from an animal other than a sheep. I often think it has a slightly different texture from the rest, though I may be imagining it. Here is a good surface view of that color.



I would be interested to have any comments that occur to you. I would also appreciate hearing from other Sinophiles, such as the well-traveled Jeff Sun!

Rich
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Old August 11th, 2018, 06:32 PM   #3
Kay Dee
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Nice decorative piece. From Batou (Patou) as I asume you know (or a very good Peking copy, which I doubt). I think a possibly a mix of maybe some nat but more chem dyes. Cotton base description gives rise to thinking possibly machine spun cotton. If no tip fade in red could it be Brazilwood - although it looks 'still' too red as it were (i.e. not enough fade), or maybe a mix of something. Depends on when made, but from pic assume circa 1920's or so (but without in hand can't say for sure as could be as late as 40's / 50's). As for yellow wool in pile, hard to say exactly, but could be camel?

Re blue, before commenting, small photo pile colour looks very different colour / shade (i.e. greyish) than nice blue of pile on full rug pic. Which is more accurate?

Thanks for posting (although I am surprised a Turkophile such as yourself would let a foreigner such as this contaminate you more westerly collection!)

Cheers.

Last edited by Kay Dee; August 11th, 2018 at 09:39 PM.
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Old August 12th, 2018, 09:34 PM   #4
Rich Larkin
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Hi Kay,

Thanks for the reply. Paotou (as I would call it), eh? I don't doubt you are right. It is significantly meatier and more substantial in a grabbed handful than Paotous I have known, but I realize there is some range that goes into these provenance attributions. BTW, I wouldn't think it is Peking; at least, it is unlike my idea of Peking feel and structure.

Here is another image showing back and front in the same shot, along with (for comparison) my original shots of the center detail and the whole rug. As you can see, any difference in the appearance of the sky blue is much less pronounced than might seem the case from the two original images I posted (back and front) of the center piece.







The full shot is pretty much what the rug looks like in real life.

There is very slight tip fade in the lighter of the two reds, or at least a lighter appearance on the surface of the rug. If you compare the lighter red in the checkerboard device in the first image, above, with the pale red surrounding the reds in the central roundel (same dye), you get the idea. As I suggested earlier, both of those reds at their respective bases remind me of a cheap piece of candy, and I have not really encountered them in other rugs of any provenance.

Regarding whether the cotton foundations are machine spun, I am not sure what to say. They (both warp and weft) consist of a fine strand made up of a few finer strands, twisted together. The component strands seem evenly fine. There isn't really much to get a firm grip on or view of. Meanwhile, I have a companion Ningshia tiger stripe mat of similar size (which I have posted here in the past, purchased with this one a good long time ago) which I am sure is much older than this piece that has cotton foundations that are very similar.

BTW, I was a fan of Chinese from the get-go. I bumped into a few of the ones with the warm apricot field, and I wish I had picked one up. My guiding principle in rugs has always been, "Buy what you like...cheap!"

Rich
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Old August 14th, 2018, 04:05 AM   #5
Kay Dee
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QUOTE=Rich Larkin

Thanks for the reply. Paotou (as I would call it), eh?

Actually, correcto! My bad.

I don't doubt you are right. It is significantly meatier and more substantial in a grabbed handful than Paotous I have known, but I realize there is some range that goes into these provenance attributions. BTW, I wouldn't think it is Peking; at least, it is unlike my idea of Peking feel and structure.

No I dont think Peking either, just threw that in as a real 'maybe', if you really felt it was not Paotou. And when I said 'Peking copy', I meant a copy made to look like a Paotou, not a Peking rug per se. But I think it is Paotou, given design elements / layout, etc. How old actually is another matter (although not saying it is not 'oldish'. But whatever, if you like it, well, you said the rest in last line of your post.

Here is another image showing back and front in the same shot, along with (for comparison) my original shots of the center detail and the whole rug. As you can see, any difference in the appearance of the sky blue is much less pronounced than might seem the case from the two original images I posted (back and front) of the center piece.

The full shot is pretty much what the rug looks like in real life.

I like the greyish blue main field, but can't say what it is dyed with. Maybe one of the experts can take a stab at that.

As I suggested earlier, both of those reds at their respective bases remind me of a cheap piece of candy, and I have not really encountered them in other rugs of any provenance.

Hmmmmm, interesting

Regarding whether the cotton foundations are machine spun, I am not sure what to say. They (both warp and weft) consist of a fine strand made up of a few finer strands, twisted together. The component strands seem evenly fine................ .............Ningshi a tiger stripe mat of similar size................ ...............which I am sure is much older than this piece that has cotton foundations that are very similar.

I cant recall off the top of my head when machine spun cotton was first introduced in China, but quite some time ago, so some beautiful rather oldish Ningxia's have machine spun cotton warp and wefts also. No harm / shame there!

There isn't really much to get a firm grip on or view of. Meanwhile, I have a companion Ningshia tiger stripe mat of similar size (which I have posted here in the past................ .............

Must / may have missed that, can't recall. Would you be kind enough to repost please?

My guiding principle in rugs has always been, "Buy what you like...cheap!"

There you go................ couldn't agree more! But oft hard to apply that 'rule', as often what one likes doesn't come cheap, and when ya just gotta' have somethin', well, you know the rest.

Last edited by Kay Dee; August 14th, 2018 at 08:51 AM.
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Old August 14th, 2018, 11:01 AM   #6
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Default 'Similar' piece

Rich, here is a (damaged) Baotou piece with a 'similar' (maybe slightly darker?) blue/grey colour border as your main field / border.

And you know, I am a wondering if the other brighter colours in yours may denote a more Suiyuan provenance (although much of a muchness / interchangeable as it were in many cases to Paotou), but................. ...........just a thought.

Lets hope blue/grey colour shows up on your screen as on mine.


Last edited by Kay Dee; August 15th, 2018 at 06:09 AM.
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Old August 15th, 2018, 05:12 PM   #7
Rich Larkin
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Hi Kay,

That image makes a very good case for Paotou. Is it your rug?

I only just realized that you had also posted a more lengthy reply to my last post. Thanks for those comments. I agree from your observations as well as the image that my rug looks like a Paotou.

Judging from the appearance of the mid-light blue in the image, the color seems very even in your rug. A feature of my piece is that the same color has a very 'heathered' appearance, unlike what I have seen in most Chinese rugs (e. g., evidently, your Paotou). It has to do with the fact that the dye was apparently taken up in varying saturation during the dyeing process. I understand that phenomenon to be related to the degree to which the yarn was scoured in preparation, with varying amounts of lanolin left in. The effect is best seen in the lower part of my image showing both back and front in the same shot. The look of the pile surface there is a good representation of the real life view. The same effect appears in the mid-blue there, used for outlining; but it is most conspicuous in the lighter shade. BTW, I have no reason to suppose those colors of blue were dyed with anything other than indigo. Perhaps you are aware that indigo dyeing involves repeatedly dunking the yarn in the vat and removing it. The more dunks, the darker and more saturated the resulting color. Based on my limited personal experience with dyeing indigo on wool, it takes about a trillion dunks to get ‘surmey’, i. e., very deep, dark blue; and I have always found it puzzling, human nature being what it is, that deep dark blue is much more prevalent in rugs than light blue.

Do you have a good grasp of the production circumstances of Paotou rugs? I have always assumed rugs from some of the outlying sources (such as Ningshia) came out of a more rustic process than rugs from the more urban settings. If that is true, it might perhaps account for certain effects such as the unevenly colored blue yarn (which I think works quite well in the end result). BTW, I heard Murray Eiland’s presentation at the Textile Museum in Washington, D. C. (since moved), on the publication of his Chinese and Exotic Rugs, which appeared in 1979. He mentioned one aspect of Chinese production that struck him (at the time he was there researching the book) as significantly different from his experience of the corresponding process in the Middle Eastern area. It was that persons working in the rug-weaving industry in China knew their own part of the process very well, whether it was wool processing, weaving, finishing, or whatever; but they had little knowledge of the details of production with which they were not directly involved. In Middle Eastern production areas, his experience was that people involved with the weaving of rugs typically had a pretty good grasp of the overall process.

Following as you requested are a few images of the Ningshia mat I mentioned.



The image above makes the yellow field a bit more intensely colored than it appears in person. The following detail view is more accurate.



Note the very subtle carving of the running key design in the pale yellow border. It is very difficult to see even with the rug in hand, but it is there. It is the sort of thing that foments and fosters unfortunate stereotypes about the subtle, inscrutable Chinese. Note also the thin line of black knots along the bottom of one of those 'tiger stripes'. There is a corresponding one on the opposite side, appearing (in the full shot) just above the mid point of the rug. It is black, not deep blue, and that color only appears in those two lines. I have examined the knots closely, and I am convinced they are original, not late inserts. The dark gray-green is evenly corrosive, and it is a color I have not really seen on any other rug. I have been looking.

Here is the back.



BTW, for what it is worth, I acquired these two rugs together from an elderly dealer who was something of a mentor for me in the early days of my interest. I was only trying to buy the Paotou rug, but he reached into his stack and grabbed the Ningshia. "You want this one, too," he said with finality. I was too shy back then to protest, and even though the price was very low, I wasn't sure at the time I could afford it. I lacked the wit to realize at the time he was doing me a big favor.

Rich

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Old August 16th, 2018, 01:57 AM   #8
Joy Richards
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The dark gray-green is evenly corrosive, and it is a color I have not really seen on any other rug. I have been looking.

Rich
Rich,

I wonder if you could explain what is meant by 'corrosive' as used here. I've tried to search for the meaning in the context of rugs, but have found nothing. And it is a description often used.

Thank you!

Joy
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Old August 16th, 2018, 04:30 AM   #9
Rich Larkin
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Hi Joy,

The most well-known corrosive dye is brown to black, which apparently results from certain elements left in the wool from the dyeing process. Reportedly, the culprit is iron salts left in the wool which weakens it and results in its erosion over time to a considerably greater extent than other colors. Most enthusiasts familiar with older rugs recognize the phenomenon of the brown or black having eroded significantly more than other colors. I firmly believe that the essential condition exists in some dyed wools to a greater degree than is seen in other wools dyed in the same way, as some rugs seem to experience relatively minimal erosion, and others a great deal. I once had an old pair of Jaff bagfaces pass under my gaze in which the brown/black wool had virtually disappeared completely.

Other colors occasionally suffer this fate, though generally to a lesser degree than the brown/black. One is an attractive light green known to have been used in the borders of old Feraghan rugs. In that case, the erosion is less, and the effect can be attractive, with the other colors standing in relief against the lower background. I believe the cause there was some form of copper used as a mordant. It is sometimes said that some dyes actually have a preservative effect on the wool. Occasionally, one will encounter an old rug obviously well cared for in which the precise height of the pile differs ever so subtly for each color, and even with some colors slightly higher than undyed wool!

Anyway, referring to my Chinese mat, perhaps you can see that those gray-green tiger stripes lie lower than the surrounding gold pile. It gives the rug a pleasing character as though sculpted. I am reasonably sure those stripes were equal in height to the gold areas when the rug was young.

Rich
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Old August 16th, 2018, 09:43 AM   #10
Kay Dee
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Hi Rich,

Just quickly as on way out, and will answer you other queries on return.

But I of course do remember now the rug you posted.

So below a comparison between your tiger and a my (big) tiger saddle rug (which I also posted previously). Mine a bit 'bright' (especially centre 'washed out somewhat) in this pic as taken hurriedly with a flash this morning.

Yours as you said from Ningxia, mine from - as has been ascertained / confirmed since previous posting - Xinjiang; note difference in knotting.



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Old August 16th, 2018, 12:32 PM   #11
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Hi Rich,

Thank you for the explanation, and I should have added that that's a really beautiful little 'mat'!

Joy
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Old August 16th, 2018, 05:29 PM   #12
Kay Dee
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That image makes a very good case for Paotou. Is it your rug?

No, a friends.

I only just realized that you had also posted a more lengthy reply to my last post. Thanks for those comments. I agree from your observations as well as the image that my rug looks like a Paotou.

It sure does (with the Suiyuan caveat thrown in, although it - Paotou / Suiyuan - was really one big rug making area back in the day, with subtle, and oft not so subtle, colour differences at times attributed to each 'area' as it were).

Judging from the appearance of the mid-light blue in the image, the color seems very even in your rug. A feature of my piece is that the same color has a very 'heathered' appearance, unlike what I have seen in most Chinese rugs (e. g., evidently, your Paotou).

Agreed, my friends is a 'flatter' more uniform - as it were - colour. I personally like the look of your 'blue/grey' better.

it takes about a trillion dunks to get ‘surmey’, i. e., very deep, dark blue; and I have always found it puzzling, human nature being what it is, that deep dark blue is much more prevalent in rugs than light blue.

I guess in the very old daze there was not a lot a time to spend on forums or glued to a mobile phone, but plenty of time to do dunking.

Do you have a good grasp of the production circumstances of Paotou rugs? I have always assumed rugs from some of the outlying sources (such as Ningshia) came out of a more rustic process than rugs from the more urban settings.

Yes that I believe is basically correct. However, my understanding is that Ningxia rugs, while having been woven long before, and well respected in central China and Tibet, gained fame in China 'proper' after a certain Emperor rode by, either on his way to visiting some other far western outlaying town, our just out pillaging, and was so taken by the quality of said Ningxia rugs that he ordered up a bunch of large ones (and so hence started, how shall I say, larger rug making 'workshops') and had them sent back east to his Court. From then on Ningxia rugs were very much in favor in the Royal Court, and their merits, as a result, spread far and wide.

If that is true, it might perhaps account for certain effects such as the unevenly colored blue yarn (which I think works quite well in the end result).

Yes it certainly does.

BTW, I heard Murray Eiland’s presentation at the Textile Museum in Washington, D. C. (since moved), on the publication of his Chinese and Exotic Rugs, which appeared in 1979.

Lucky you! I just have the book.

It was that persons working in the rug-weaving industry in China knew their own part of the process very well, whether it was wool processing, weaving, finishing, or whatever; but they had little knowledge of the details of production with which they were not directly involved.

Hmm, sounds very much just like navy divers the world over to me.

In Middle Eastern production areas, his experience was that people involved with the weaving of rugs typically had a pretty good grasp of the overall process.

Sounds like very very advanced civilian deep divers to me.

Following as you requested are a few images of the Ningshia mat I mentioned.

It's a beauty!

Note also the thin line of black knots along the bottom of one of those 'tiger stripes'. There is a corresponding one on the opposite side, appearing (in the full shot) just above the mid point of the rug. It is black, not deep blue, and that color only appears in those two lines.

If you look at the small Ningxia rug I posted in first post this thread, it also has some 'out of place' red lines too. Odd.

I was only trying to buy the Paotou rug, but he reached into his stack and grabbed the Ningshia. "You want this one, too," he said with finality. I was too shy back then to protest, and even though the price was very low, I wasn't sure at the time I could afford it. I lacked the wit to realize at the time he was doing me a big favor.

Yes, a BIG favour, especially today. So called Tiger Rugs are HIGHLY sort after! It was the rug you didn't know you needed to have. Reminds me of what one of 'your' recent DS's once said, i.e. "......you have the known knowns, the known unknowns, and the unknown unknowns", or something along those lines.

EDIT: By the way Rich, I'd put your tiger definitely pre 1900, while mine circa 1920 / or say 1920's.

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Old August 16th, 2018, 11:00 PM   #13
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Hi Kay,

Thanks for that very interesting commentary.

One footnote about Murray Eiland and his Chinese book. He was in fact a very affable and approachable guy who used to appear with some regularity at Textile Museum theme-based weekends that used to occur annually every October. As easy-going as he was in personal manner, he was unmovable in his take on rugs, which he saw as trying to sort through a mountain of dubious literature and traditional lore. Accordingly, he took nothing for granted, and attempted as much original research as he could manage. This outlook got him to China in the late 1970s in the course of producing his book.

He gave a presentation on his experiences with Chinese authorities (in the immediate aftermath of the "Cultural Revolution"), which he found at the same time interesting and frustrating. On his part, he tried as much as possible to gain access to persons with experience and understanding of the rug weaving industry in China in as early a period as was possible. The authorities, on the other hand, seemed to have little information of that nature; and though he described them as extremely hospitable, he said their entire interest in him was to gain his wisdom and advice about where they should be steering their then contemporary rug weaving industry. He showed some slides of some unbelievable concepts in the form of pilot project rugs they had submitted to him. I don't recall too many specific examples, only that they seemed wildly improbable. One I do remember was a pictorial rendition of an extravagantly designed automobile in the spirit of the late 1950's and early 1960s, with prominent chrome-plated, bullet-shaped projections from the grill, and massive tailfins, all in trompe l'oeil style. It was the sort of car I might have gone for at one time; but probably not the rug. I don't know whether too many of such concepts got to the international markets.

Rich
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Old August 17th, 2018, 02:53 AM   #14
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Hi Joy,

Thanks for posting that very interesting saddle piece. Obviously, that distinctive, stylized take on a tiger pelt was rolling around China in some fashion for a long time. I wonder how that happened, where it came from. In truth, most of the tigers of my acquaintance looked a little different than that when it came down to the pelt. It was years before I realized it was trying to be a tiger pelt. But who am I to argue with thousands of Chinese artists?

In the 'ouch' department, I must mention that the back of your saddle rug shows some moth damage. Were you aware of it? The easiest place to point it out in the detail shot of the back is along the right bottom edge in that line of blue knots that runs from the diagonal white line in the design that starts near the middle of the image and runs along to the right to the section of white canvas-like flatweave. About a quarter of the way along (left to right), the blue nodes, which are the backs of knots, give way to five consecutive vertical little sections of white warp. Those should also be covered by blue nodes, but moths have eaten them away. Essentially, they have eaten the backs of the knots there.

There are other spots. One other I will mention is at the very top of the second from the left of those repeating little designs that look (to me) like stylized fish scales along the bottom of the image. Where the point of that one at the top touches the bottom of another of the scales, there is a horizontal row where several of the exposed warp sections appear.

The downside of this condition is that the pile sections can fall out of the rug upon brisk handling, and washing is verboten!. My understanding is that if a piece can be fit into a subzero freezer and left for an extended period, it kills anything that needs killing. Sorry to be dropping this kind of disheartening news on you, but if you werenít aware of the situation, I figured you needed to be.

Rich
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Old August 17th, 2018, 04:34 AM   #15
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My understanding is that if a piece can be fit into a subzero freezer and left for an extended period, it kills anything that needs killing.
Hi Rich

A stay in a deep freeze might do the job, but several cycles of freezing and thawing will be more reliable. The thing that kills the nasties is that the fluid in the cells pierces the cell membranes as it freezes and thaws. This works for African wooden objects that have been infested with wood boring insects. It kills the insects and the eggs.

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Old August 17th, 2018, 06:14 AM   #16
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Hi Rich,

Thanks for that very interesting commentary.

Your welcome.

He showed some slides of some unbelievable concepts in the form of pilot project rugs they had submitted to him. I don't recall too many specific examples, only that they seemed wildly improbable. One I do remember was a pictorial rendition of an extravagantly designed automobile in the spirit of the late 1950's and early 1960s, with prominent chrome-plated, bullet-shaped projections from the grill, and massive tailfins, all in trompe l'oeil style.

I cant post now, but as soon as it is sold late next week, I'll post a photo of a very very unusual pictorial rug!

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Old August 17th, 2018, 06:39 AM   #17
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Hi (again) Rich.

Hi Joy,

I think you mean Kay? Anyway, almost same as there is a 'y' in both, so no harm done. Close enough is sometimes, but only sometimes, good enough.

Thanks for posting that very interesting saddle piece. Obviously, that distinctive, stylized take on a tiger pelt was rolling around China in some fashion for a long time. I wonder how that happened, where it came from. In truth, most of the tigers of my acquaintance looked a little different than that when it came down to the pelt. It was years before I realized it was trying to be a tiger pelt. But who am I to argue with thousands of Chinese artists?

Did you ever look like this one below though? More a pussy cat than a tiger if you ask me, as a matter of fact it actually looks like a cat I once had (or did he have / own me?). Or it's a very benign tiger at that! Although to be truthful look closely and you will see blood dripping from his long fringe whiskers.

IMAGE BELOW:Most likely an almost unused Tibetan saddle 'top' rug (Masho), 2nd half 19c (somewhere in there between 1850 -1900, and probably towards the latter half of that actually. Undyed natural wool, save for the 'blood'.)




BTW, in Buddhist iconography "........the tiger represents the spiritual strength associated in the striations of the skin with the humble flexibility of bamboo.", or that's what comes out of a Google translation re a book on said subject.

In the 'ouch' department, I must mention that the back of your saddle rug shows some moth damage. Were you aware of it?

Double ouch! No, my old eyes are obviously not what they once were as I thought back just worn, till you point out exact areas. Bugger and blast!!!!

The downside of this condition is that the pile sections can fall out of the rug upon brisk handling, and washing is verboten!.

Yikes, ouch, ouch OUCH! That falling out of pile would be Nasty, with a capital N or possibly all caps!

Sorry to be dropping this kind of disheartening news on you, but if you weren’t aware of the situation, I figured you needed to be.

As much as I didn't want to hear that, you are CERTAINLY correct in me wanting to know. THANKS!

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Old August 17th, 2018, 05:20 PM   #18
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Hi Kay,

My deepest apologies.

And the same to Joy. I scrutinized the back image of the saddle piece so much, sitting there just above Joy's byline, I was hypnotized. If that explanation isn't acceptable, plan B is, I'm a doofus.

On the merits of the case, interesting kitty-kat saddle. Is the structure of that typical Tibetan, as in 20th century production? I take it the dark elements are (indigo) blue. Yes? I like it.

Rich
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Old August 17th, 2018, 08:56 PM   #19
Rich Larkin
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Hi Kay,

Donít worry too much about the pile falling out. I acquired this Baluch in Teheran over fifty years ago in blissful ignorance of the fact that it had a huge amount of the same, moths-ate-the-knots disease.



See the evidence in this composite shot of afflicted and immune sections (taken from the back). It is still in the shape it was then. Granted, I have not used it on the floor. It did hang on a wall for many years.



Rich
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Old August 17th, 2018, 09:02 PM   #20
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Default Corrosion explosion....

Hi Joy,

I thought I would add a footnote to the corrosion note by providing a couple of illustrations.

This Baluch rug has black wool showing corrosion throughout. (It is especially common in Baluch.)



It is somewhat severe in some places, such as elements along the bottom border where you can see the white foundation showing through. In addition, a lot of the design features are outlined with a thin line of corroded black that gives the rug a carved or sculpted character. This is often considered a desirable feature when it is moderate and controlled. It is almost under control in this rug. Anyway, the rug managed to find a good home where no one makes fun of it.

Here is a detail shot of the same.



This Persian khorjin face features the light green I mentioned in an earlier email in the skinny middle border and also on a few of the pretty, recumbent ĎSí forms in the flanking borders.



As you can see, the dye lot changed two-thirds of the way up the piece.



I apologize for the fuzzy photography, but perhaps you can make out that the green here is lower than the surrounding red.


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